Warrior trike- 1st build

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Are you worried about strength at all with it being 12mm hub, 3/8th bolt and the plans showing a 14mm hub with a 5/8th bolt?
 
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12mm hubs are fine. Sturmey use 12mm in their single sided drum hubs. Having said that they use a 12mm bolt. My own 12mm hubs use an 8.8 high tensile 12mm bolt. I'd worry about that 3/8 bolt bending. Ive seen plenty of 3/8 axles bend even in regular bike use and mounted at both ends.

I find potholes are much harder to avoid on a trike due to the width of the machine than a bike.
 
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From there I welded a washer to the heads and ground them to the same size as the outer diameter of the inner bearing.
Do they spin freely ?

Only doing the above you run the risk of the bearing shield rubbing on that washer ?

The washers you welded to the heads should be the same diameter as the inner race's , so only touching the inner races of the bearings.

Even my Sturmey Archers hub brakes suffer from this.

Paul
 
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Apr 26, 2021
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Do they spin freely ?

Only doing the above you run the risk of the bearing shield rubbing on that washer ?

The washers you welded to the heads should be the same diameter as the inner race's , so only touching the inner races of the bearings.

Even my Sturmey Archers hub brakes suffer from this.

Paul
Yes.

 
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12mm hubs are fine. Sturmey use 12mm in their single sided drum hubs. Having said that they use a 12mm bolt. My own 12mm hubs use an 8.8 high tensile 12mm bolt. I'd worry about that 3/8 bolt bending. Ive seen plenty of 3/8 axles bend even in regular bike use and mounted at both ends.

I find potholes are much harder to avoid on a trike due to the width of the machine than a bike.
I think it's this only 3/8". Will have to stop by menards to check.


If I'm right, the RC is 38-43.
 
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The 12.9 will mean zero bending but a bigger chance of snapping over an 8.8. I have no idea whether my mid tensile or your extra high tensile is the better choice of the two. If mine ever bends I'll move up and if yours snaps you can move down on the scale. Undoubtedly better than any 3/8 bolt either way.
 
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The 12.9 will mean zero bending but a bigger chance of snapping over an 8.8. I have no idea whether my mid tensile or your extra high tensile is the better choice of the two. If mine ever bends I'll move up and if yours snaps you can move down on the scale. Undoubtedly better than any 3/8 bolt either way.

Rock on. I was looking into things regarding automotive applications of classes 8.8, 10.9 and 12.9.

8.8 - stuff like suspension, brakes, rotor mount bolts, etc.

10.9- bolting larger parts together with higher stress like the chassis.

12.9- for even higher stress applications like the engine.

Figured since I dropped down to 12mm, I might as well go for the higher stress option to compensate.

Going to be looking into swapping out the rear axle rod for a higher grade.
 
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I used 12.9 hardness 12mm bolts on my SA drum hubs on the Wonky-Donkey II there were no issues (at least in respect of the bolts) :)
 
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Popped the M12 bolts in the hubs. Got like a glove.

Had to use a washer to tighten it up. Threads were just barely beyond the hubs. Wheel freely spins.

Kweld showed up a yesterday.

As for protecting the batteries, I went and acquired two 20mm rocket box ammo cans.

Going to build platforms and attach them like saddlebags.

 
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At which end though ?

Paul
The connection points of the frame to the square tubing axles.

The wheels aren't perpendicular to the ground.

They slant outwards at roughly a 97 degree angle.

Going to cut the welds and fix it.
 
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The wheels aren't perpendicular to the ground.
Sorry I was not precise enough , I can see the crazy angle , however is that at the wheel/kingpin joint or the frame to wheel arm joint ?

Good luck with you cut and shut , others on here have built jigs to help with that bit.

Paul
 
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It also looks like the horizontal piece of the fork tube is leaning to one side instead if being parallel to the ground.
 
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Frame to each wheel arm.

If I'm right, both arms need the metal removed between the 90 and 83 degrees points. That would allow me to fold the arms back up to the frame and make the wheels perpendicular to the ground.
 
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It also looks like the horizontal piece of the fork tube is leaning to one side instead if being parallel to the ground.
Yep. Messed that up by 3 degrees in the very beginning.

Was planning on coming back to that after the front wheels are fixed.
 
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If you get some M12 studding and 4 nuts you can thread it between the axle mounting tabs once you've made the cuts. Only cut the top and two sides of the inner arm to main frame member and leave the bottom welded and just bend it up. If the gap closes before it's bent far enough then run the cutting disc down the cut again. Repeat until it's bent enough. Once somewhere right the studding will go in and when the nuts are tight against both sides of both tabs the tabs they will ensure the tabs are vertical (at least when measured against each other). You'll need to eyeball it to ensure they are both in line with the rear. If the tabs are vertical the wheels will be.
 
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