Streetfox Headtube angle template

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May 16, 2019
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Assuming that builders will follow advice, and use the material, in the dimensions recommended, would it be possible to create a paper template that one could print, but out then use to mark the cross tubes to cut steering tube angles?
 
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May 16, 2019
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Especially seeing how touchy steering head angles are, this aid would overcome what admittedly is the biggest hurdle in this build. I know it would alleviate any concerns I might have. (Hint)!
 
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Apple Valley, California, USA
Sadly the thread I wrote on my welding jigs is now defunct due to postimages screwing up the photo address
:(:(:( on the old forum .
Emma, I was able to retrieve virtually all my lost postimages by using this.

Switcheroo Redirector

Was surprisingly simple..check it out.
 
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Nov 10, 2019
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Just spent about 30 minutes looking over the street-figher building plans and think making a jig is MUCH smarter than the eyeball it, tack, retack approach suggested.
does anyone have any photos of jigs they have made to get the caster angle and the center point angle correct? My initial thought is to use a square head tube and compound miter saw to get the two angles correct. Since the head tube is square aligning it via simple measurements should be easier. But maybe my theory does not work out in real life. I have tons of t slotted aluminum that is usefull for jig making.

*a square headtube could be made by simply putting a square tube who's inner diameter is the same as the outer-diamter of the round tube. and welding it on. OR using a piece of channel slightly narrower than the round head tubes's outer diameter and welding it on to give one flat side.

It's too bad the archives are gone, seems like there was a lot of good info in them.
 
Last edited:

Twinkle

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My jig design was one of the many that disappeared, the original way we did it was to jig bore it with a vertical mill with the offsets added in . Last few were done with the same technique using a pillar drill .
Tan = opposite / adjacent was the easy way to calculate it . iirc about 5 or 6 mm square drilling opposites top and bottom.
 
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Not exactly what you asked but one tip is the use of a long bit of threaded bar and 4 nuts between the two wheel mounts to hold the completed head tubes in the correct alignment with each other to weld the axle between them. The threaded bar ensures your wheels will be parallel to each other.
 
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and the manual says the centere point angle is specific to your build. Which I dont' understand,
Could the above center point angle be 20 degrees and still work instead of the approximate 10 degrees from vertical shown?
 
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been using Twinkles idea of a 5mm square on both sides of the cross bar then drilling the 1 1/4 inch holes on opposing sides. I need to recheck weather it was 5mm square or 10mm square.
Using SKETCHUP will reveal correct angles
 
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The centrepoint angle is specific to your build because it depends on both the width and offset of the hub on your wheels and to a lesser extent the width of the rims.
 
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The centrepoint angle is specific to your build because it depends on both the width and offset of the hub on your wheels and to a lesser extent the width of the rims.
I understand that, but how what are the befefits of using an angle between 10 and 25 degrees? as long as the centerline is concentric to the rotation point it will work, so why choose 10 degrees over 20 degrees?
 
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Having a little camber (wheels tilted towards each other at the top) can aid in getting the tyre to dig into the road surface instead of trying to roll around on the rim in cornering. In practise I've yet to have any issue with them vertical.
 
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I understand that, but how what are the befefits of using an angle between 10 and 25 degrees? as long as the centerline is concentric to the rotation point it will work, so why choose 10 degrees over 20 degrees?
I'm unsure what you're asking. A line through the headtube should intersect the road at the point of the tyres contact. Your "choice" is to make this happen or not.
 
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I understand that, but how what are the befefits of using an angle between 10 and 25 degrees? as long as the centerline is concentric to the rotation point it will work, so why choose 10 degrees over 20 degrees?
Are you meaning the caster angle?
If so the greater the caster angle the greater the self-centring effect. In practise there's not a massive difference. I generally go for around 10 degrees rather than more to keep the head tube bearing nearer it's intended use angle.
 
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If you add spacers to the wheel's axle so you can have a larger angle you're just encouraging it to bend. The bigger the angle the more wheel flop as it turns so I'd just go with the hub as is and keep the angle lower.
 
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It is the axle width that dictates the angles pictured above, as it intersects at the point of contact on the road. The longer the axle, the shallower the angle. One doesn't design for a certain angle. One has that angle applied as a function of the axle/hub width.

Caster is another thing. It is the number of degrees that the kingpin, the bit that rotates when you steer, is laid back from the vertical. In other words, pushed away from the viewer in the above images.
 
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