Ed's 'StreetRunner' Quad Build

Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Perfect solution, only requiring a small alteration!

Brad
I often wondered if a tapered bearing would be better suited seeing how the wheel is supported ONLY on one side.
Small tapered bearings are available.
A ball bearing is designed for rotational loads, not sideways.
It's not too late to change things. But it would have been nice if these valid points would have come up earlier.

Be that as it may, I can redo the whole spindle set up (at a later time).
The reason I went with using a head tube, ( I repeat myself here) is that this project started out to be a tandem bicycle build.
Thus not requiring the same load concerns as the present configuration.

I also thought that using bearings vs. no bearings would make steering easier.
If they really aren't that necessary then maybe something along the lines of the example below could be fabricated.



I could remove the bearing races, weld a top and bottom onto the headtube (with predrilled king pin holes).
I can make it adjustable for camber while I'm at it.
Make the 'U' bracket that would attach to the axle, and have a disc brake mount as well.
I think I could use my existing tie rod arms as well.
Like my drawing above. #698
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Ponder more - Work less

I had to take a break from this, while I pondered what if anything I should do about the front spindle situation.
I did look at it with serious intentions of reworking the whole set up.

But after much thought about my main goal, I have decided to keep going with my original design. I'm confident that for the intended use, the present design will work. I will at a later time, re-address this issue and a design change.

The heat has kept me out of the shop, recently. It's averaging around 103-107 (F) inside, so I get pretty worn out and need to get in where I can get cooled down and hydrated.

In the last few days, I've been able to make new stronger caliper mounts and a trial fit.



The first mounting position wasn't quite right, so off it came. Also discovered that the disc adapter was not true. So I spent a considerable amount of time, with a 'persuader', gently love tapping it until it behaved and fell in line.

Next, I needed to address yet another out of alignment issue. The 1/2" spacers I made were themselves not very true in length. So I abandoned that method and cut out a woodblock, which I cut in half to form two spacers.
Worked first time out. The disc and the caliper mount are parallel with each other.

There's virtually no out of line movement. But, I haven't finished truing up the wheel, so that may pull something out of alignment.




I would like to replace the wood spacer with an aluminum one.
As pictured the disc brushes against the outer pad ever so slightly. Maybe just enough to help seat itself when the time comes to adjust them. There isn't any discernable, 'gaping' while turning the wheel. But if need be, a shim may be required where it bolts to the mount.


But for now, it's like a tack weld, temporary so the project keeps moving forward.
Hmmmmm...I might tack weld the nuts to the disc adapter.

 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Water boils at 212 (F) See where this is going?

With the first assembly done, I've moved on to the second.

It's been slow going due to the heat...and not from the sun I might add.

But speaking of the heat here is today's temps.

Inside the shop.................................. 108 degrees (F)
On the patio (shaded) .....................112 degrees (F)
Out in the direct sun ........................122 degrees (F)



Inside my brain....boiling temperature
But I'm practicing my anger management techniques, so all is well.


Two steps forward- one step backward


For some reason, this second set is giving me a hard time.
Try as I will, to get everything lined up and centered, the end product doesn't show it.

So I've elevated the sun's temperature with a bit of my own.

The first hole ended up off-center a fraction. (I started working from the center hole outwards)
I have no idea how it got off-center unless it moved in the clamps.
Welded-in a new centerpiece and redrilled.
Trying to center, the 'center' hole, back into the center, has been the center of my attention.
So I welded everything solid and started over.

Second try still not to my liking.
But after some finish filing, it's done.
I would have been way ahead to just have made a completely new one.
But no, I won't let one hole get the best of me.

And to add to the problem, my step drill bit for the second to the last hole has gone dull.
So I can't get to that last hole. Grrrrr. So it's out with the file.

 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Looks like you need a thermometer with a higher scale - you appear to have run off the top of it!
I've just come back from the shop. It's now up to 110 (F) inside.
The scale has ended but there is more room for the indicator to rise.
Only 'exaggeration' room left now. :D

Managed to get one more flange end drilled (sans mistakes)
1/8th " center hole and 24 spoke holes.

I need to make a run to get another step drill. The largest drill bit I have is 1". I need 1 1/4"

I think it's time to step up, to a better step drill bit. I seem to be using them more and more, and they are not lasting long.
Maybe 'cobalt steel' this time. No more titanium 'coated'.

Kevin

I just noticed your post. I tried to file mine, but even as cheap as they are, my files were no match for the step drill bit.
I'm just going to buy new again. I've bought two or three times before, but the same cheap titanium HF ones.
It's time to spend a few dollars more and hope it will be worth it.
I'm going to try their cobalt steel bits.

https://www.harborfreight.com/cobalt-steel-step-drill-bit-set-2-pc-64647.html?_br_psugg_q=step+drill+bit
 
Joined
May 31, 2013
Messages
2,811
Location
South Benfleet, Essex, England, UK
Ed'
Can't you use a hole-saw holder with an appropriate hole-saw and go exact-size or fractionally under and file it out for a perfect fit?
I get great results with starrett constant-pitch hole-saws they are affordable and very good quality.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Ed'
Can't you use a hole-saw holder with an appropriate hole-saw and go exact-size or fractionally under and file it out for a perfect fit?
I get great results with starrett constant-pitch hole-saws they are affordable and very good quality.
Yes, I can do that. And because HF (neither store) had the cobalt step drills that I wanted in stock, I may have to go that way.
Their truck won't be in until Thursday, and there is no guarantee the drill bits will be on that shipment.

I have 4-5 hole saws but not the right size. I might just buy the one I need tomorrow, just so I can keep working.
All three flange plates are cut. Just need to finish grinding them 'round'.
And drill out the center of the last one.
Then it's on to welding it all together so it resembles a hub.

I still want to replace my worn out step drill.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Been a sour few days.:mad:

I went ahead and bought a 1 1/4" hole saw with arbor. So I thought.
When I got home and looked at the package, the arbor was missing. How I missed not seeing that I don't know.
Somebody took the arbor out and put the package back.

Anyway, another trip back to the store to get it exchanged.
Well, that was only the beginning. Online said they had 3 in stock.
Actually there were none.
I had to buy it without the arbor. Saved $3.00
I really wanted that arbor so I would have two.

I was able to complete drilling out the last flange. But I am having major problems getting the first flange to weld on straight.
I've made three attempts, and it still isn't right.

No matter how I've jigged it or clamped it when I check it, it's off.
I thought maybe it had to do with welding distortion, but I doubt that as I have it clamped very tight. So maybe the tube isn't cut straight, or the bearing cups are causing a problem.

Tomorrow I will have to cut a new axle tube as this one has been through some rough handling. The flange itself needed some flattening as well.
The first one was far easier to make.
It's supposed to be the other way around.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
776
Location
Axedale, Victoria, Australia
Website
axerail.coffeecup.com
What I do is thread the components onto a vertical axle shaft, and let gravity hold things in place. Are your tubes through the flanges or are the ends butted against them? Either way, with appropriate setting up, it should work. A level surface with an axle hole drilled through it and you should be away.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Are your tubes through the flanges or are the ends butted against them?
The axle tube goes through the flange. That is why I needed the 1 1/4" hole saw. (see # 705)

Either way, with appropriate setting up, it should work
.
The key here is " appropriate set up"
The first hub went together with virtually no problem.
Why I'm having problems with this one I haven't figured out...yet.

A level surface with an axle hole drilled through it and you should be away.
I have the flange flat, with the magnets holding the tube in place. Checked for square.
The last jig set up used a 'C' clamp to hold the tube in the flange, flat against a metal plate.
And the flange was clamped to the plate as well.

It shouldn't move. So I'm reasoning that my tube ends are not truly square.
The first disc flange required some adjustment because it was not perfectly square.
I'm trying to avoid that this time.

Today I'll be cutting a new tube, install the bearing cups, and truing up the ends again.
Hopefully, all the planets are in alignment and things will turn out much better.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Funny how 24 hours can make all the difference.
This is a strange world we live in.

I made another tube axle and inserted the bearing cups.
I took great pains to make sure everything was as square as I could make them.

I set up the jig much the same as before but with much less trouble.
I do have a tiny bit of truing to be done, but it is much less than the 'wobble' size I was getting yesterday.
And less than the first hub.



And yes I did remember to offset the spoke holes.



I think this set up is ready for lacing into the rim.
Then it will be onto cutting out the second disc caliper bracket.

 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Got the new hub laced into the second rim. (Looks the same as the other one)
I'm not happy with it, however. It doesn't spin as accurately as the first hub. Haven't figured what to do about it yet.
The first one just took a few taps with a persuader and all was well. Not sure if that is all that is needed in this case.

Been dealing with high heat so not much gets done.

I did finally get the incentive to move my outside work post. Started early this morning before the sun got too high.

Started by digging the holes. Then trying to pull out the post.
But as you can see, that didn't work as intended. I over-estimated the strength of the post.

Not to worry. I have another 7-8 feet of the same size tube. (salvaged from old basketball hoop post)
Here you can see, that I've cut off the top portion which will be reused on the new post.
I will cut off the remaining piece and fill the dirt back in.
Maybe think about how to reuse the remaining base.....hmmmmmmm?



The post is about 1.5 ft in the ground topped with 120 lbs of cement and about 8" of dirt that will dry rock hard in this desert heat.
Should be plenty strong. If not I have one more 60lb bag of cement.



Showing the relation to the shop. This will be a lot better than constantly taking my Workmate in and out.



Welded the top portion from the old post to this new post.
There's a bolt-on wood table top that needs to be cut down in size.



And the final project. Now to nurse my hernia, get some ice tea, and type this out.
I have a paint job yet to do but it's just way too hot. The paint would dry in mid-air.

 
Joined
May 31, 2013
Messages
2,811
Location
South Benfleet, Essex, England, UK
Got the new hub laced into the second rim. (Looks the same as the other one)
I'm not happy with it, however. It doesn't spin as accurately as the first hub. Haven't figured what to do about it yet.
The first one just took a few taps with a persuader and all was well. Not sure if that is all that is needed in this case.

Been dealing with high heat so not much gets done.

I did finally get the incentive to move my outside work post. Started early this morning before the sun got too high.

Started by digging the holes. Then trying to pull out the post.
But as you can see, that didn't work as intended. I over-estimated the strength of the post.

Not to worry. I have another 7-8 feet of the same size tube. (salvaged from old basketball hoop post)
Here you can see, that I've cut off the top portion which will be reused on the new post.
I will cut off the remaining piece and fill the dirt back in.
Maybe think about how to reuse the remaining base.....hmmmmmmm?



The post is about 1.5 ft in the ground topped with 120 lbs of cement and about 8" of dirt that will dry rock hard in this desert heat.
Should be plenty strong. If not I have one more 60lb bag of cement.



Showing the relation to the shop. This will be a lot better than constantly taking my Workmate in and out.



Welded the top portion from the old post to this new post.
There's a bolt-on wood table top that needs to be cut down in size.



And the final project. Now to nurse my hernia, get some ice tea, and type this out.
I have a paint job yet to do but it's just way too hot. The paint would dry in mid-air.

Ouch! That's some heat you have there Ed'.
When I lived in South San-Jose in 86/7 we had a warm one. Luckily, an afternoon breeze would strike up and clear the smog (and some of the heat) and by pure luck we had a swimming-pool and hot-tub in the back yard. 🙃 Happy Days indeed.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Ouch! That's some heat you have there Ed'.
When I lived in South San-Jose in 86/7 we had a warm one. Luckily, an afternoon breeze would strike up and clear the smog (and some of the heat) and by pure luck we had a swimming-pool and hot-tub in the back yard. 🙃 Happy Days indeed.
There's a coincidence. I too lived in San Jose. Circa 1957 until 1965. The first graduating class from W.C. Overfelt High School in 1964.
We lived just below Alum Rock Park in the Mt Pleasant area.
I just checked my old home, which was in a nice area back then. But it looks shabby now.
 
Joined
May 31, 2013
Messages
2,811
Location
South Benfleet, Essex, England, UK
There's a coincidence. I too lived in San Jose. Circa 1957 until 1965. The first graduating class from W.C. Overfelt High School in 1964.
We lived just below Alum Rock Park in the Mt Pleasant area.
I just checked my old home, which was in a nice area back then. But it looks shabby now.
I was in CA for 2 years courtesy of IBM. We were in Sunnyvale for the first year and South San-Jose for the second.
734 Starbush Drive in Sunnyvale.
4955 Rue Bordeaux in South San-Jose. This still looks great. Tiny plot but it had all we needed.
 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
Mocking up for the next phase...maybe.

New hubs/brakes/spindles and calipers are done for now.
Adjustments later.


Needing perspective with a top on it.
Debating whether to cut the center out or just leave it solid.




I think I will leave it solid while I am working on welding it in place.
Still have in mind a tan vinyl top with a candy red metallic body.
Another option is to use tan/sand colored 'wrinkle' or 'textured' paint.



The cut-down chairs fit near perfect.
The right height, right size. Looking to put a parking brake handle between the seats.
That is if I decide not to put the passenger ejection seat in... :D



Once the seats are re-upholstered, all will blend together.


 
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Messages
2,859
Location
Apple Valley, California, USA
And topping It Off...

The top has been cut and set in place for it's fitting



Decided to add a bit of style to the back portion.
I've lifted the top 1 inch and fastened 14 inches from the end, giving a nice flare-up.
It will be contoured in with body filler.



There was a couple of points around the edge that didn't make it to 'quality school',
so had to enlist the help of a couple of nails to fill in the gaps.




I'm trying to fill in with weld material as much as possible. Not that I really need to, but it gives me practice with the welder.
Also, I want to keep the body filler to a minimum.
Using it mainly to fill in low spots, and weld pinhole areas.



I'm working with 20 gauge sheet metal so there is some blow through and subsequent repair.
My Hobart goes down to 25 amps which helps somewhat.



A look at the side profile.

 
Top