Ed's 'StreetRunner' Quad Build

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Sep 12, 2012
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Apple Valley, California, USA
There are thousands of examples, of hot rod engine configurations.

I'm wanting to achieve an 'old school' hot rod look.

The six carburetor 'log manifold', has always been one of my favorites.
I had one when I was young and inexperienced (and broke) back in high school.




And one of my favorite custom hot rod builders. Ed Roth, made some really far out creations.
https://www.ratfink.com/ed-roth-cars.php

Tweedy Pie was one of them.


With that thought in mind, (the beer can for carbs idea) is just a way to replicate, while adding a bit of humor to the project.
 
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Fishmouth cutting completed.

On to cutting discs that will hold the stud for mounting to the engine.
Discs have been cut, the stud threads cut into the discs, and Permatex applied.
Never used as a bonding agent with Plexiglass....here's hoping.


Discs glued in place, using one of my favorites...J B Weld.
Curing in their temp cradles.


Attaching to the engine

The first of two aluminum brackets, the complete unit will bolt to.

The engine head angle, where the 45 degree tubes will attach, is not perfect.
So a game plan, as how to end up with the 'stacks' vertical, had to be thought out.

I will mount the 8 angled tubes, to the brackets, and square them to the engine.
Next will be to align the fish mouths.
If all is correct, I will be able to drop the 'stacks' into the fish mouths,
and line up the stacks vertically, and then glue in place......at least that's the theory.

 
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The rough cutting of the PVC tubing is completed.

Spent most of the last couple of days, off and on, fabricating studs, drilling where the base plates will attach to the engine.
and making a new upper log portion.

It takes me a bit longer now days, because of the feet thing. Have to get off of them after just a couple of hours.
Rest them awhile, and go for another couple of hours +/-.



Mounted the base plates, using my newly acquired, 'rivnuts'. Had a problem with the first one being to loose in its hole.
Don't have the correct size drill bit, to make it just small/large enough, to make a binding fit.
So to solve the problem, I pre-squashed them partially, which with a little tap or two, made them fit tight in the hole.
Seems to have worked so far.



I was having major issue with the fit using the 'pan' in the center.
While trial fitting, and practice alignment of the upper log tubing, I discovered that to solve that problem, will be to do away with it.
I will be designing a new replacement pan, or modifying the existing one.





 
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What it is

One of eight 1/4 - 20 rivnuts installed for securing valve cover.


What I used

My homemade rivnut installation tool



How I did It

Hold the two left wrenches, turn/tighten with the right wrench.
The rivnut will compress and mushroom out, thus securing itself to the sheet metal.

On the right is a completed rivnut, with a 'temp' bolt in place.
Background rivnuts and relief holes for the manifold bolts.



How It Goes Together



Latest mock up for the cowl and dash board design.

1x1 square tube bracket will be consealed within/behind the lower panel.
Just a design thought at this time

 
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Took a break from working on the manifold.

But I'm getting ahead of my story.

I'm all for DIY, but the 'D' part can, at times, be time consuming, and harder than it needs be.
So I have a miter saw, and looked into using a 'metal cutting' blade on it.
Found where many have done this, successfully...and safely.

So I ordered a Oshlun 10" x 52 blade.


My saw runs at 4800 rpm, which is under the 5000 rpm max for this blade.
I used it to cut the 1x1x.0625 tubing for the cowl support.
I made it through six cuts and it abruptly stopped cutting.(Yes I went by the rules)

As you can see all went great until....well let the picture speak for itself.


One last try, thinking I was doing something wrong, ....it's possible...NAH! ๐Ÿ˜ˆ



Contacted toolcity2013, whom I bought it from.

They suggested I should contact Oshlun, which I did.
Toolcity2013 forwarded my information to them.(with photos)

Oshlun promptly got back to me, and said they would send a replacement blade. (REALLY?...that's a $50 blade)
YUP !..no questions asked, and they provided, some tips about using the blade.
I specifically asked what their recommended running rpm, should be.
They said the optimal speed should be around 2500 rpm. I wished that information was either on their website or on the blade.

I received my replacement blade about an hour ago.

So now I'm looking to get a motor control, to slow the saw down, and we will see how that works.
Also looking to buy the blade sharpener, offered by Harbor Freight.
Most of the video's I watched, make me believe it might be a 'OK' investment.


OK, back to the cowl, and its mounting.

Trial fit...waiting to be welded in place.



Inside cover cut and mounted



With possible dashboard.



Maybe this piece is too thick for this purpose.
Maybe some beveling would help to change the profile.

Burnt cut from using wrong band saw blade
Bought a new one and the results show, on the other end. (next photo).


Distant perspective.

 
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nice work as usual. Purchased a metal cutting wheel (will locate supplier?) that is thinner and cut many sections of metal with little to no issues.
Your dashboard looks way to thick. Why are you using 3/4" think material??
1/4" or even 1/8" Baltic Birch plywood would be lots lighter.
 
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nice work as usual. Purchased a metal cutting wheel (will locate supplier?) that is thinner and cut many sections of metal with little to no issues.
Your dashboard looks way to thick. Why are you using 3/4" think material??
1/4" or even 1/8" Baltic Birch plywood would be lots lighter.
I agree, it really does look out of place.

The cowl is made from 3/8" birch plywood.
I happen to have some wood from an old child's bed.
Didn't have any use for it and it was near the size I want to make the dashboard.

I'm not so worried about weight, as I am about aesthetics.
At this point I'm still looking for other design options for the dash.

In fact as I write this, another design idea has popped into mind.
 

Radical Brad

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I also give my thumbs up for the supercharger look!
Just imagine a small motor spinning the belt, and having the intake valves move when you push down on the pedal and make that engine sound play!

2822

Brad
 
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Nice work Ed.
This is regarding Brads comment above.
I have looked at a few Youtube videos about people making props for comic cons.


All made from EVA foam
I just playing in my mind with the possibility this technique and material has to offer.
 
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Nice work Ed.
This is regarding Brads comment above.
I have looked at a few Youtube videos about people making props for comic cons.


All made from EVA foam
I just playing in my mind with the possibility this technique and material has to offer.
Thanks
Nice tip. I will keep this in my creative mind
 
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It's a wee bit warm in the shop today.๐Ÿ”ฅ

Fans a blow'n, but I'm still a go'n.
It's dropped 2 degree's, from 98 degrees earlier. (+/- 2:30 pm)



Started my day bright and early, (a cooool, 6 a.m ish), welding in the cowl brace/bracket.

Working on feathering in the four tubes on the second half of the manifold.
My can of Bondo, is really old and drying up. Had to stop using it.

I am trying this Durham's Water Putty.
I've used this often over the years and have always liked it. This is the first time I've used it with PVC.
My first try this morning didn't work to well. I put it on too wet, and tried to 'speed dry' it, but only succeeded in causing a poor bond.
Second and subsequent applications, with patience, proved to work much better.



First manifold half, waiting for another primer coat.
I've run out of primer, so a trip Wally World tomorrow.
Also need to pick up a cake decorator syringe.....bet you can't guess why I need that!



Tried out the speed control on the miter saw.
It helped greatly. I made a practice cut on some 1 x 2 and it cut perfectly.
A definite decrease in the amount of sparks. Virtually none.

I ran it on the slowest speed first, and it cut easily, and with no noticeable decrease in efficiency.
Can't really tell what the rpm's may be, but guessing by the sound, maybe it's 1/2 of what it was.
That would put the rpm's around 2400, which is near the optimal speed Oshlun recommended.
Need a handheld digital tachometer to know for sure.
No apparent strain on the motor. But will continue to monitor this.

 
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A Little Progress, a Lot Of Heat

My shop has been hovering around 107 F, everyday this last week.
Been getting in a bit of work, between 5:30 - 6:00 am and somewhere around 10 am, each day.
Usually its getting pretty warm by 10 am, (inside the shop) even with two large fans going.

Anyway, here are a couple of teaser photo's of my current progress on the log manifold.
I just came in from painting the mounting base. I will let it dry overnight and,
hope to have the rest put together sometime in the next couple of days.

I have worn my fingers sore from Bondo sanding, rough sanding, smooth sanding, primer sanding, etc.

I used Rust-Oleum, Textured Metallic, Silver.
I am thinking of painting the engine block red, same as the frame will be.
Should be a nice contrast.



These beer cans are very light weight, and dent just looking at them wrong.
Currently trying to find a filler that will make them hard. Tried water putty, which works great except trying to get it inside,
while leaving room for the center tubing, has proved a challenge.

Just tried Loctite, Gap & Crack foam filler. It is supposed to be denser than other spray foams. I have my doubts.
It's drying hard but may no be hard enough. Cure time is around 24 hours, so I'll see what its like tomorrow.

The 'velocity stacks' on the top, may be on borrowed time. Not sure if they should match the bottom (silver),
or red, ....or ? Also thinking of maybe replacing them with a 'straight up' style.

 
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the beer cans are supposed to be square as in your pic of street rods. The velocity stackscould be a cone?
Engine block = Chevrolet orange as per SRod pic
Coors Light cans are already silver and better beer.
As for the shop look into a ductless heat pump. We have one (a DIY kit) several years ago. Work well as a cooler and heater.
 
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the beer cans are supposed to be square as in your pic of street rods. The velocity stackscould be a cone?
engine block = Chevrolet orange as per SRod pic
Coors Light cans are already silver and better beer.
As for the shop look into a ductless heat pump. We have one (a DIY kit) several years ago. Work well as a cooler and heater.
Thanks for the idea's

Can't say I've ever seen a square beer can...though I'm sure they probably exist somewhere.
This project will be a Candy Apple Red Metallic. So I'm thinking the Orange will probably clash, in this instance.

I chose Budweiser because, It creates interest, It's a beer can, and It's red.
I'm not a lover of beer. Especially Budweiser...it's just too harsh for me.
But when I did have a beer or two, in a much earlier life, I also found Coors to be quite tasty.
I actually preferred the malt liquors, E.g., Colt 45, and/or Country Club.

I actually started this project with the idea of using 'FULL THROTTLE' energy drink cans.
The brand name alone, sparks interest.


I installed a small heat pump, in our office, back in Vermont, It kept us quite comfortable, winter and summer.
Something I'll keep in mind, when I want to spend the money.
What with a new shop, and an unexpected car replacement, I'm OK with what I have.

Today isn't to bad, it's only 100 in the shop, but I have some breeze outside and fans going, so I'm dealing with it.

Today's Progress

Made a new cover for the engine top.

Drilling out relief holes, in the new cover, for the mounting plate nuts and bolts.


Finally vacuumed inside, and now ready for new cover plate.


New cover plate test fit. Not 'too bad' considering it's hand bent.
Have to install aluminum mounting angle tabs inside, front and back.


Manifold mounted with center cover in place.
It appears I have developed a crack, on the 3rd tube from the left. (2nd from the right, if right handed)
 

SirJoey

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My cozy little nook in the corner!
I think this is gonna be the coolest quad I've ever seen, Ed!
That PVC really took on the look of metal after painting! (y)
***
 
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I think this is gonna be the coolest quad I've ever seen, Ed!
That PVC really took on the look of metal after painting! (y)
***
Thanks Sir Joey

I strived to achieve a rough aluminum look.
I used a Textured Metallic Silver, trying to replicate the rough surface of an aluminum manifold.
It came out looking and feeling just the way I envisioned.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Stops-Rust-12-oz-Textured-Metallic-Silver-Protective-Spray-Paint-251053/202531527

A couple of modifications

1st mod


I cut the carburetor scoops, trying to replicate (sorta) the real thing.
Didn't really like the 45 degree PVC look. (Post #54)
I will paint them silver, to match the manifold, and red inside.
The bug screens inside, show up a lot better now.
And the hose clamps add a bit of 'BLING'




2nd mod

Possible change to the orientation of the Budweiser logo.
From a 'side view', (top photo) to a 'front view'.




3rd (next?) mod

Buying the fittings and copper pipe for a 'faux' fuel line to/between the carburetors.

4th (next?) mod

Still looking/deciding on a set of spark plug wires, on the cheap.

And lastly, looking in the last photo, you will see in the background, in front of the tires,
a template for what may become, the front portion of the new 'body' and bench seat.

The engine is shaping up nicely, the dash/support, for the windshield is in.
My thoughts have been going to just how is the final body going to look.
I've been brainstorming the body style, and just how to make it, with my limited expertise, and equipment.
I have an idea, but it's still a bit early to reveal anything yet.

Before you know it, it will be time to 'seriously', start thinking about, what will power this creation.
 
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